Full Body Harness

  • Comfort- Is the harness padded in areas it will be supporting your weight? Even support for a short time will quickly be felt wherever those straps dig in.
  • Convenience- Does it have enough loops and straps to carry all your gear? Will it be easy to don properly?
  • Safety- Is your harness up to OSHA standards for your particular job? For example are you operating a bucket truck or climbing a tower? I do both these things and have a different harness for each.
  • Proper application- If you did fall, in what position will your body be hanging? If your lanyard is attached at the waist, you’ll be alive but I guarantee you’ll be hurting.
  • Fit- Climbing harnesses are available in several sizes. They are also have different weight ratings. If you are big and tall you may need a custom made harness.
  • Capacity- The weight rating includes your body weight and the weight of all your tools.
  • D-rings- the more the better. My harness has six. All full body harnesses should have a dorsal D-ring.
  • Repel Seat- When all your weight and the weight of your tools is being supported by your leg straps as when you must repel, it will cut off blood to your legs unless you are sitting on something. You can buy these seats separately, but my harness has it incorporated. It is also nice to rest in.

There are many jobs in which working at heights is a necessity. Tree trimmers, power company employees, window washers, people that work on radio and cellphone towers. The construction industry. If your employer does not require you to wear a safety harness, wear one anyway. It could mean the difference between living to talk about it or taking all your meals through a straw or worse.

Truth be told, there is a good deal more to a full body harness, than simply just preventing some sort of fall. If, it happens that you slip when you are doing work up high, you’ll be glad you took steps to make sure you’re fully protected. A full body harness can do just that. Your neck and extremities can all be protected in a suitably fitted harness.

A full body harness has more uses than just on the job. I am sure you can think of many uses to keep yourself protected around the home. I like to do many of the “honey-dos” around the house myself and save the money for a contractor. You will always find me in my harness anytime I am on the roof or trimming the trees. When I am helping a buddy, I make sure he has one as well.

According to OSHA, thousands of people are either killed or injured from slips, trips, and falls. Unfortunately its rules and regulations are written in blood. Most of the injuries or deaths we hear about in the news that result from falls can be prevented. I mentioned this before but it bears repeating. Ensure you have the proper harness for the proper situation or job. Firefighters have a harness made to withstand high temperatures. People that perform high rescues use a harness that enables them to more easily retrieval a person in distress.

Once again a climbing harness is not the only piece of protective equipment you should use. When working at heights I regularly don a climbing hard hat, eye protection, a shock absorbing lanyard as well as a top of the line tower climbing harness. No cost is to great when it comes to my safety. I recommend you purchase the best equipment available and inspect it regularly.

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